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Oakley Smith Barker

#33603, b. 28 March 1855, d. 18 April 1905
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Oakley Smith Barker was born on 28 March 1855 in Manhatten, New York, USA.1,2 He was the son of Smith Barker and Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt.3 He was baptised on 18 April 1855 in Washington Square Church, Manhatten, New York, USA.2 Oakley died on 18 April 1905 in Stamford, Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA, aged 50.3 Oakley was buried in Green Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York, USA.3

Child of Oakley Smith Barker

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - Washington Square Church, Members, Baptisms, Marriages, 1828-1880.
  3. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.

Smith Barker1

#33604, b. 27 June 1835, d. 10 June 1869
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Smith Barker was born on 27 June 1835 in Manhatten, New York, USA.1 He was the son of Isaac Oakley Barker and Sarah Purdy.1 He married Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt, daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt and Sophia Johnson, on 17 May 1854 in New York, USA.1,2 Smith died on 10 June 1869 in Manhatten, New York, USA, aged 33.1 Smith was buried in Green Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York, USA, in lot 585 section 120.1

Children of Smith Barker and Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - New York City, Compiled Marriage Index, 1600s-1800s.
  3. [S7] Ancestry.com - U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, 1639-1989.

Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt1

#33605, b. 23 August 1836, d. 8 August 1881
Last Edited=28 Jul 2019
     Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt was born on 23 August 1836 in Manhattan, New York, USA, she was the thirteenth child.1,2 She was the daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt and Sophia Johnson. She was baptised on 18 January 1837 in Staten Island, New York, USA, at her parents home.3 She married Smith Barker, son of Isaac Oakley Barker and Sarah Purdy, on 17 May 1854 in New York, USA.1,4 Her husband Smith died on 10 June 1869 in Manhatten, New York, USA, aged 33.1 She married Pierre Gustave Lafitte.1 Catherine died on 8 August 1881 in Aquitaine, France, aged 44 she had been ill for some months and her death was not unexpected.1 Catherine was buried in American Cathedral Church of Paris, Paris, France.1

Children of Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt and Smith Barker

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - Web: Netherlands, GenealogieOnline Trees Index, 1000-2015.
  3. [S7] Ancestry.com - Staten Island, New York Church Records, 1749-1828.
  4. [S7] Ancestry.com - New York City, Compiled Marriage Index, 1600s-1800s.
  5. [S7] Ancestry.com - U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, 1639-1989.

Isaac Oakley Barker

#33606, b. 1804, d. 1866
Last Edited=26 Jul 2019
     Isaac Oakley Barker was born in 1804.1 He married Sarah Purdy.1 His wife Sarah died on 1852.1 Isaac died in 1866.1

Children of Isaac Oakley Barker and Sarah Purdy

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.

Sarah Purdy1

#33607, d. 1852
Last Edited=26 Jul 2019
     Sarah Purdy married Isaac Oakley Barker.1 Sarah died in 1852.1

Children of Sarah Purdy and Isaac Oakley Barker

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.

Isaac Barker1

#33608, b. 11 July 1837, d. 16 April 1874
Last Edited=26 Jul 2019
     Isaac Barker was born on 11 July 1837.1 He was the son of Isaac Oakley Barker and Sarah Purdy.1 Isaac died on 16 April 1874 in USA aged 36.1 Isaac was buried in Green Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York, USA, in section 120 lot 585.1

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.

Pierre Gustave Lafitte1

#33609, b. 1839, d. 1925
Last Edited=26 Jul 2019
     Pierre Gustave Lafitte was born in 1839 in Paris, France.1 He married Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt, daughter of Cornelius Vanderbilt and Sophia Johnson.1 His wife Catherine died on 8 August 1881 in Aquitaine, France, aged 44 she had been ill for some months and her death was not unexpected.1 Pierre died in 1925 in Paris, France.1 Pierre was buried in American Cathedral Church of Paris, Paris, France.1

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.

Clarence Johnson Barker1

#33610, b. 4 May 1857, d. 24 November 1857
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Clarence Johnson Barker was born on 4 May 1857 in New York, USA.1 He was the son of Smith Barker and Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt.1 He was baptised on 12 June 1857 in New South Dutch Church, New York, USA.1 Clarence died on 24 November 1857 in New York, USA, his death appeared in the New York Evening Post he was 6 months 20 days old.2

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - U.S., Dutch Reformed Church Records in Selected States, 1639-1989.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - U.S., Newspaper Extractions from the Northeast, 1704-1930.

Cornelius Vanderbilt

#33611, b. 27 May 1794, d. 1877
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Cornelius Vanderbilt was born on 27 May 1794 in Port Richmond, Staten Island, New York, USA, His parents were poor and his father earned his living by providing low level transportation services. As was usual for the common people in those days.1 Cornelius went to work at age 11, and was employed by his father and for the ferry services serving Staten Island until 1810 when he convinced his parents to lend him $100 so he could buy a sailboat to start his own ferry and freight business. They provided him with the money but with the understanding that he would share the profits from the business with his parents. He used the money to start a passenger and freight service between Staten Island and New York City. There was a lot of competition in the ferry service business, but Vanderbilt competed on the basis of lower fares, asking as little as 18 cents per trip. He was quite successful and apparently was able to repay the $100 loan to his parents within one year. According to local lore, he was even able to earn a $1,000 for his parents during the first year of operations as part of their share in the profits.1 The war of 1812 provided new opportunities for growth. The forts around New York City expanded and Vanderbilt obtained a government contract to supply them. Between 1814 and 1818 he expanded with additional schooners for freight and passenger services in Long Island Sound and in the coastal trade from New England to Charleston, South Carolina.1 He married Sophia Johnson on 19 December 1813 Cornelius and Sophia were first cousins and had 12 children over a twenty five year period. Eleven survived into adulthood.
Phebe Jane Vanderbilt Cross [1814-1878]
Ethelinda Vanderbilt Allen [1817-1889]
Eliza Vanderbilt Osgood [1819-1890]
William Henry Vanderbilt [1821-1885]
Emily A. Vanderbilt Thorn [1823-1896]
Maria L. Vanderbilt Clark Niven [1827-1896]
Francis L. Vanderbilt [1828-1868]
Cornelius J. Vanderbilt [1830-1882]
Maria A. Vanderbilt La Beau Berger [1834-1902]
Catherine J. Vanderbilt Barker La Fitte [1836-1881]
George W. Vanderbilt [1839-1864].1 In 1818 he sold all his sailing vessels and became a steamboat captain and partner with Thomas Gibbons who operated a ferry service between New Brunswick, New Jersey and New York City. The Vanderbilt-Gibbons partnership charged only a quarter of the competitive fares. It soon became the dominant ferry service on the busy Philadelphia-New York City route. During the 1818-1829 time period the partnership made a fortune.1 In 1829 Vanderbilt decided to go on his own and began passenger and freight service on the New York City-Peekskill Hudson River route. Again he competed on the basis of price and quickly eliminated the competition. He then expanded his service to Albany, New York. He also opened passenger and freight service to the Long Island Sound, Providence and Connecticut areas. By the 1840s Vanderbilt had a fleet of 100 steamships and he had become the biggest employer in the United States. At that point he not only competed on the basis of price but also on the basis of comfort, size, speed, luxury and elegance in the steamship passenger transportation industry.1 During the California gold rush in 1849, Vanderbilt began steamship service to San Francisco by way of Nicaraqua. His competitors used the Panama route which was longer. Vanderbilt was able to cut two days off the length of the trip to San Francisco, and it was 600 miles shorter. This part of his transportation business netted him over one million dollars per year. As a result he became the principal transportation service provider on the East Coast to San Francisco route.1 In the 1850s he did two possibly foolish things. In 1853 he decided to take his first vacation ever. He had a steam yacht built and made a triumphant tour of Europe. While on his trip he had left the management of the business to contract managers. They tried to fraudulently take over the business while he was away in Europe. Although they were not successful, his temporary absence from his business proved to be costly, but he quickly recovered. Another not so successful business attempt was trying to compete against the British Cunard Steamship Line, a line subsidized by the British government, on the North Atlantic passenger service route. This also proved to be a failure. So the old fox discovered that not all his ventures were automatically successful.1 In the 1860s he became aware that the big growth in the future for the transportation industry was not by way of water but by way of rail. So he became interested in railroad transportation, which was then still in its infancy. But instead of building new railroads, he took the easier route of buying existing railroads. He acquired the Long Island Railroad followed by the New York and Harlem Railroad and the Hudson River Railroad. In 1867 he also acquired the Central Railroad and merged it with the other railroads he already owned. As he had done with his shipping ventures, he focused on improving service and on upgrading capital equipment while maintaining low fares. He eventually merged all his initial acquisitions into what became known as the New York Central Railroad. It is estimated that he made $ 25 million in the first five years from his railroad ventures.
The eventual main heir to his empire, his son William Henry Vanderbilt, influenced his father to expand rail service into the direction of Chicago. To do so they acquired the Lakeshore and Michigan Railway, the Michigan Southern, the Canadian Southern and the Michigan Central Railroad, creating for that time the largest American system of railway transportation.1 His wife Sophia died on 1868 This was a great loss to him. She had provided him with ten still living children and apparently was a good business woman herself, supporting and advising him in many of his business decisions. One of the things that is not widely known is the fact that Cornelius was a meticulous planner and analyst. Before he entered into any deal or venture he would meticulously analyze it and have it evaluated by others before making a decision. Many people attribute his success to luck. In reality Cornelius was a super smart and astute business man and hands-on manager of his many businesses. Although he may have made some mistakes along the way, he was always able to either cut his losses or extract himself from the occasional debacle. And undoubtedly, he often involved his wife Sophia in many if not most of his business decisions.1 He married Frances Armstrong Crawford in 1869 in New York, USA, Frances was a distant cousin named Frances Armstrong Crawford, and known as Frank. She was 34 years his junior. The marriage was probably a good one because it gave him a new outlook on life. It is doubtful if his children approved of it. After all, his new wife was younger than seven of his twelve children. It appears that the marriage to a younger woman gave him an imagined extension to his life.
Allthough Vanderbilt had not engaged in philanthropy at all until that point in his life, through his new wife's influence, he perpetuated his name through a gift of one million dollars to Nashville's Central University. One million dollars may not sound like a lot of money, but in the 1870's it was. Using a conversion ratio of 260, based on the gross domestic product per capita then and now, the one million dollars was essentially equal to $260 million in today's terms. The Nashville Central University would become, and to this day still is, the prestigious Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.
Frances signed a pre-nuptial agreement, agreeing to receive $500,000 in bonds after his death, a great sum at the time but a fraction of Vanderbilt's fortune.1,2 Cornelius died in 1877 Upon his death, Cornelius Vanderbilt, also known as Commodore Vanderbilt, was the wealthiest man in the United States and probably the greatest of the nineteenth century railroad barons. Earlier in his business career he probably was the greatest shipping tycoon in the United States. His estate was worth 100 million dollars, a sum unheard of in those days. He left the bulk of his estate to his son William Henry Vanderbilt, because he was the only child who had been actively involved in the business that produced the Vanderbilt fortune. William Henry also had been instrumental in building and expanding the railroad business since he joined his father in the management of the organization upon becoming an adult.
He had left the bulk of his estate to his son William H. Vanderbilt and only gave modest amounts of half a million dollars to each of his other nine surviving children. Needless to say his will was contested but the suit was thrown out. He also donated $50,000 to the Church of the Strangers in New York City. Following his death the offspring did not suffer. Even half a million dollars, equal to 130 million dollars today, was also a substantial amount in 1877. The value of the Vanderbilt estate in today's terms would have been about $26 billion.1

Child of Cornelius Vanderbilt and Sophia Johnson

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.newnetherlandinstitute.org.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - en.wikipedia.org.

Sophia Johnson

#33612, b. 1795, d. 1868
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Sophia Johnson was born in 1795. She married Cornelius Vanderbilt on 19 December 1813 Cornelius and Sophia were first cousins and had 12 children over a twenty five year period. Eleven survived into adulthood.
Phebe Jane Vanderbilt Cross [1814-1878]
Ethelinda Vanderbilt Allen [1817-1889]
Eliza Vanderbilt Osgood [1819-1890]
William Henry Vanderbilt [1821-1885]
Emily A. Vanderbilt Thorn [1823-1896]
Maria L. Vanderbilt Clark Niven [1827-1896]
Francis L. Vanderbilt [1828-1868]
Cornelius J. Vanderbilt [1830-1882]
Maria A. Vanderbilt La Beau Berger [1834-1902]
Catherine J. Vanderbilt Barker La Fitte [1836-1881]
George W. Vanderbilt [1839-1864].1 Sophia died in 1868 This was a great loss to her husband. She had provided him with ten still living children and apparently was a good business woman herself, supporting and advising him in many of his business decisions. One of the things that is not widely known is the fact that Cornelius was a meticulous planner and analyst. Before he entered into any deal or venture he would meticulously analyze it and have it evaluated by others before making a decision. Many people attribute his success to luck. In reality Cornelius was a super smart and astute business man and hands-on manager of his many businesses. Although he may have made some mistakes along the way, he was always able to either cut his losses or extract himself from the occasional debacle. And undoubtedly, he often involved his wife Sophia in many if not most of his business decisions.1

Child of Sophia Johnson and Cornelius Vanderbilt

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.newnetherlandinstitute.org.

Frances Armstrong Crawford1

#33613, b. 18 January 1839, d. 4 May 1885
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Frances Armstrong Crawford was born on 18 January 1839 in Alabama, USA, her parents were Robert Leighton Crawford (1799-1853) and Martha Eliza Everett (1820-1898.)1,2 She married Cornelius Vanderbilt in 1869 in New York, USA, Frances was a distant cousin named Frances Armstrong Crawford, and known as Frank. She was 34 years his junior. The marriage was probably a good one because it gave him a new outlook on life. It is doubtful if his children approved of it. After all, his new wife was younger than seven of his twelve children. It appears that the marriage to a younger woman gave him an imagined extension to his life.
Allthough Vanderbilt had not engaged in philanthropy at all until that point in his life, through his new wife's influence, he perpetuated his name through a gift of one million dollars to Nashville's Central University. One million dollars may not sound like a lot of money, but in the 1870's it was. Using a conversion ratio of 260, based on the gross domestic product per capita then and now, the one million dollars was essentially equal to $260 million in today's terms. The Nashville Central University would become, and to this day still is, the prestigious Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.
Frances signed a pre-nuptial agreement, agreeing to receive $500,000 in bonds after his death, a great sum at the time but a fraction of Vanderbilt's fortune.1,2 Her husband Cornelius died on 1877.1 Frances died on 4 May 1885 in New York, USA, aged 46.2

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.newnetherlandinstitute.org.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - en.wikipedia.org.

Clarence Johnson Barker

#33614, b. 19 April 1864, d. 11 February 1896
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Clarence Johnson Barker was born on 19 April 1864.1 He was the son of Smith Barker and Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt. Clarence died on 11 February 1896 in Biltmore, North Carolina, USA, aged 31 he returned from Europe in August and contracted a cold which developed into the illness of which he died. He was a graduate of Magdalen College in Cambridge, England and of the Frankfort Conservatory of Music.1,2 Clarence was buried on 15 February 1896 in Greenwood Cemetery, Brooklyn, New York, USA, in the family plot in lot 585 section 120.1,3 His estate was probated on 3 July 1896 in London to his sister Adele Schmidt (wife of Caspar Frederick Schmidt). His effects were valued at £2,111 1s 7d.2

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1995.
  3. [S7] Ancestry.com - Brooklyn, New York, Green-Wood Cemetery Burial Index.

Adele Elma Barker1

#33615, b. 25 January 1860, d. 20 July 1920
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Adele Elma Barker was born on 25 January 1860 in Manhatten, New York, USA.1 She was the daughter of Smith Barker and Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt.1 She married Caspar Frederick Schmidt. She witnessed the probate of the estate of Clarence Johnson Barker on 3 July 1896.2 Adele died on 20 July 1920 in Magnolia, Essex, Massachusetts, USA, aged 60.1 Adele was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, New York, USA.1

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations), 1858-1995.

Caspar Frederick Schmidt

#33616
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Caspar Frederick Schmidt married Adele Elma Barker, daughter of Smith Barker and Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt.

Virginia Purdy Barker1

#33617, b. 20 February 1862, d. 7 April 1919
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Virginia Purdy Barker was born on 20 February 1862 in Manhatten, New York, USA.1 She was the daughter of Smith Barker and Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt.1 She married Walter Rathbone Bacon on 16 February 1882 in Bordeaux, France.1 Her husband Walter died on 14 November 1917 in Fifth Avenue, Manhatten, New York, USA, aged 72.1,2 Virginia died on 7 April 1919 in 247 Fifth Avenue, Manhatten, New York, USA, aged 57 from a complication of diseases at home.1 Virginia was buried in Woodland Cemetery, Bronx, New York, USA.1

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - /en.wikipedia.org.

Walter Rathbone Bacon1

#33618, b. 22 February 1845, d. 14 November 1917
Last Edited=27 Jul 2019
     Walter Rathbone Bacon was born on 22 February 1845 in Le Roy, Genesee County, New York, USA, his parents were David Rinaldo Bacon (1812-1890) and Elizabeth Rathbone Bacon (1821-1892.)1 He married Virginia Purdy Barker, daughter of Smith Barker and Catherine Juliette Vanderbilt, on 16 February 1882 in Bordeaux, France.1 Walter died on 14 November 1917 in Fifth Avenue, Manhatten, New York, USA, aged 72.1,2 Walter was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery, Bronx, New York, USA.1

Sources of Information

  1. [S7] Ancestry.com - www.findagrave.com.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - /en.wikipedia.org.

Kate Tracy Janet Hill1

#33620, b. about 1964, d. 19 August 2018
Last Edited=25 Aug 2019
     Kate Tracy Janet Hill was born about 1964.1 She married Kevin Greathead.1 Kate died on 19 August 2018 in Yorkshire, England, after a long illness.1 Her body was cremated on 30 August 2018 in Halttemprice Crematorium, Willerby, Yorkshire, England.1

Children of Kate Tracy Janet Hill and Kevin Greathead

  • Danny Greathead1
  • Rebecca Greathead1
  • Alex Greathead1

Sources of Information

  1. [S40000] Website funeral-notices.co.uk/national/death-notices.

Keith B Goff

#33624
Last Edited=12 Sep 2019
     Keith B Goff married Patricia Robinson, daughter of Alan Millar Robinson and Gladys Chester, in 1953 in New Forest, Hampshire, England.1

Sources of Information

  1. [S3] GRO Indexes - 1953/Q1 New Forest Volume 6b Page 765.

Christine Louise Greathead1

#33625, b. 23 July 1950, d. 14 September 2019
Last Edited=17 Sep 2019
Relationship
4th great-granddaughter of George Greathead
Appears on charts:
Chart 18 - George Greathead
     Christine Louise Greathead was born on 23 July 1950 in Newton, Massachusetts, USA.1,2 She was the daughter of George Thomas Greathead and Anna Elizabeth Scannell.1 She married ... Canavan.1 Christine worked for many years as a hairdresser.1 She married George Chasse.1 Christine died on 14 September 2019 in Newton, Massachusetts, USA, aged 69.1

Children of Christine Louise Greathead and ... Canavan

  • Richard Canavan1
  • Stephanie Canavan1

Sources of Information

  1. [S40045] Newspapers theberkshireedge.com.
  2. [S7] Ancestry.com - Massachusetts, Birth Index, 1860-1970 - Volume 109 Page 401 Index volume no 154.